"Book On It"

“Where is your bookmark?”

My bookmark is in the novel, “Tangerine” by Christine Mangan. Browsing the shelves at my local library, the book spine caught my eye. Reading the first sentence, I knew it would be a good read.

In the story, Alice is spending time in Morocco (a place I am hoping will be my next travel adventure) when she meets John. The first few pages detail the insatiable allure of Tangier as Alice meets John. Later in the story, Alice sees Lucy. The connection between them was bright and for some time has been complicated. When John goes missing, Alice questions her well-being and further her connection to Lucy.

I told myself last year I will read more mystery books. Alas, I have not read many books in the genre that held my attention. Now, I get to pick back up on my word and dig into this story. Also, I am hoping for any reference to where the novel got its title from.

"Book On It"

“Where is your bookmark?”

My bookmark is in the novel, “Your Blues Ain’t Like Mine” by Bebe Moore Campbell. I had never read her work, which seems to be the beauty of being a life long reader. Although I heard of Moore Campbell, I am learning about her writing and impact in my community. I had this same feeling with the author Dorothy West.

The novel is about Armstrong Todd, a fifteen year old Chicagoan who spends a life-changing summer in Mississippi. The first page of the novel is incredibly symphonic and sensual. It sets an indelible tone that leads the story.

"Book On It"

'“Where is your bookmark?”

My bookmark is in “Killing the Black Body: Race, Reproduction, and The Meaning of Liberty” by Dorothy Roberts. This book has been on my “to-read” shelf for years. In a treacherous political climate of women’s access, or lack thereof, to their body and reproductive health, I found it was finally time to delve into this book.

As the book focuses on black women, there is a heightened part that opens the discussion. Roberts wrote this book over twenty years ago. The information is not new yet affirms the atrocities occurring to black women in their pursuit of life and autonomy of their body.

"Book On It"

“Where is your bookmark?”

My bookmark is in the same novel as last week. I am on vacation out of the country. As much as I would love to have a suitcase full of books, I decided it was more practical to continue with the book I have. There are many adventures to enjoy where I am.

I hope your summer is beginning wonderfully. May you have lots of great reads in store and new places to read them!

"Book On It"

“Where is your bookmark?”

My bookmark is in the novel, “The Midwife of Hope River” by Patricia Harman. The first sentence immediately brings you into the story. Patience Murphy is the titular character in the Appalachian Mountains. Through the first few pages of the story, I got the tension of her character as she is escaping her previous life in Pittsburgh although I do not know yet why. This novel is also set in the early 20th century, which did not have the medical advancements most reader are accustomed to now. The tools and knowledge Patience acquires only amplifies how she can deliver children and encourage mothers in a moment of vulnerability and possibility.

So far, the writing is gentle, hopeful, and mysterious. Patience is being presented as a curious and wonderful character in the lonesome of her life and the people she works with as a Midwife.

"Book On It"

“Where is your bookmark?”

My bookmark is in the novel, “Summer of Salt” by Katrina Leno. It did not dawn on me until now that this novel is a beach read and summer is arriving.

Georgina has graduated high school, along with her twin sister Mary, and is about to embark on the next part of her life. No not going to college and leaving the small island where she grew up. She is anticipating her powers that come when women in her family turn eighteen years old. Along with the tribulations of the quaint life Georgina has always known, she is discovering multiple facets of her identity and being an independent young woman.

The YA novel is a wonderful read so far. Georgina as a narrator is fantastic. I feel like I’m walking around with her on the island, smelling the salt, gazing at the stars. Their shenanigans are realistic as young adults.

"Book On It"

“Where is your bookmark?”

My bookmark is in “Holy Envy” by Barbara Brown Taylor. I listened to her conversation with Terry Gross on “Fresh Air.” I was intrigued by her career as a professor of religion and prior in parish ministry. Brown Taylor works at a private liberal arts college in the Appalachian Mountains, which already gives a fascinating setting as it is in the Bible Belt.

I have not read many books about faith. I am looking forward to learning about the many religions Brown Taylor features including Judaism and Buddhism.

"Book On It"

“Where is your bookmark?”

My bookmark is in “Dying of Whiteness” by Jonathan M. Metzl. He was on the “Why Is This Happening?” podcast with Chris Hayes. The thesis of the book is racial resentment is destroying the American Heartland. White people are voting against their interests in order to preserve their whiteness and politicians who uphold it. In the sea of politically driven books written as of late, exhausting topics surrounding one person, I am interested in reading this book for a different perspective on a demographic that seems to be self-sabotaging for the sake of continuing personal ideals.

"Book On It"

“Where is your bookmark?”

My bookmark is in “Parkland: Birth of a Movement” by Dave Cullen. He also wrote “Columbine,” oddly one of my favorite books for its deep reporting of the subjects, the aftermath of the school shooting and heart for the survivors. I expect the same writing for this book, which chronicles survivors of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and their path to launch March for Our Lives, an initiative to prevent gun violence.

If you judge a book by its cover, you will buy this one right away. The cover features a peach sunset with protest signs along a chain link gate with one prominently noting “Never Again” with Florida nearly in the shape of a gun.

"Book On It"

“Where is your bookmark?”

My bookmark is in the novel, “The Living is Easy” by Dorothy West. Cleo Judson is a Southerner turned Northerner living in Boston. She is a fair-skinned black woman, upset by her daughter’s dark skin, in control of her husband, Bart and eager to live in Brookline to showcase her wealth status.

The novel, published in 1948, is timely as colorism, race, class, among other societal topics, are discussed. I was engrossed in the novel about twenty pages in for the world West created for Cleo and her family. Heartbreak, childhood trauma and jealousy are among the themes prevalent in the novel. West’s writing is also incredibly poetic. I quietly reacted with an “uh huh” as I absorb the story. Most of her sentences I read twice in order to understand the depth. The title of the novel is quite telling.

"Book On It"

“Where is your bookmark?”

My bookmark is in the short story collection, “How Long ‘Til Black Future Month?” by N.K. Jemisin. The title grabbed my attention for a thought-provoking, “why has this question not been asked?” In various articles, I read the innovation of the stories in progressing and opening the imagination about what black life can be. The introduction of this collection is a source for Jemisin’s inspiration and journey for her writing.

Based on the first story, I decided to skim through some stories to understand the essence of the plot. The book is quite long for a short story collection. There is a story titled, “Sinner, Saints, Dragons, and Haints in the City Beneath the Still Waters,” (another wonderful title) about creatures in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. I am eagerly waiting to read it. It is the last story of the collection and likely positioned for a great ending.

"Book On It"

“Where is your bookmark?”

My bookmark is in “Thick” by Tressie McMillan Cottom. I kept my eye on the conversation regarding this book. I watched Cottom on “The Daily Show” and admired how she articulated many issues pertaining to black women and how society reacts to it, often prematurely. This is also the crux of the book continuing from her perspective. Much of the book is written in an academic tone, which attributes to Cottom as an academic. I have to reread certain sentences to absorb its wealth or make sure I comprehend what was written. There are many truths spoken between each period.

I have another bookmark in the novel, “A Gathering of Old Men” by Ernest Gaines. Every time I go to The Los Angeles Central Public Library, I pick up a book. The novel was in the wonderful classics section. The story is about the tense aftermath of a black man who kills a Cajun farmer. It is set in Louisiana. The emotions of the novel are set right from the first page. I love Gaines as a storyteller for his honesty and place for his characters.

Book On It

“Where is your bookmark?”

My bookmark is in the novel, “Beebo Brinker” by Ann Bannon. I loved the story’s beat in “I Am A Woman.” Once I found out Bannon wrote a book series, I immediately added the novel I’m reading to my library checkout. Beebo is one of the most intriguing characters in “I Am A Woman,” who is the title character of the novel I’m reading. Are you keeping up with the details?!

Beebo Brinker is a queer woman navigating New York City from her homely upbringing in Wisconsin. She begins to develop an alluring attitude with the company she keeps. I am mostly fascinated by these books because they were written in the late 50s and early 60s. That era was ripe with exploration in identity and culture. These themes feel risqué or revolutionary to illuminate in literature today. The pace of the novel breezes on the page as the characters come alive.

Book On It

“Where is your bookmark?”

My bookmark is in the novel, “The Honey Farm” by Harriet Alida Lye. Cynthia knows how to breathe life back into her farm after a drought stops the bees. When residents respond to her advertisements about an artists’ colony she created, what ensues is a reinvigoration of a community, revelatory dynamics and personal restoration.

The imagery is solid. I am brought right onto the farm. It is also stirring and multi-layered. I love a great story. The pages turn like butter. This is wonderful for a debut novel.

"Book On It"

“Where is your bookmark?”

My bookmark is in the novel, “The Salt Eaters” by Toni Cade Bambara. I learned about Bambara when she was featured by “Well-Read Black Girl” on her birthday. I am nearly embarrassed I never heard of her. Still, it is a prime opportunity to read her prolific and imaginative work.

The novel is about black people who live in a city somewhere in the South called Claybourne. They are searching for people who carry the healing properties of salt. I am not always sure where I am in the novel. It is an act of patience as I read along. There seems to be a new character on the page. I am intrigued by the use of language and sharp bits of humor.

"Book On It"

“Where is your bookmark?”

My bookmark is in the novel, “I Am A Woman” by Ann Bannon. Laura, a young woman from the Midwest, moves to New York City to escape childhood trauma. While in New York City, she moves in with a woman who brings back feelings of a previous relationship.

Published in 1959, the book reads as a spin-off to “Catcher in the Rye.” It is prolific and electric story. Every character is richly written on the page. Their arcs flow wonderfully on the page. The book reads lightly even in dramatic moments. New York City reigns as an essential character for Laura’s growth and discovery as well.

"Book On It"

“Where is your bookmark?”

My bookmark is in the novel, “Black Leopard, Red Wolf” by Marlon James. I have been waiting for the email to arrive from the library to pick up this book. Fortunately, it was only a couple of weeks wait seeing this book was highly anticipated. Tracker, a mercenary who is seemingly mythical, is hired to search for a missing boy. Questions linger as Tracker digs deeper into finding the boy, bringing potential mistrust and mystery.

I am looking forward to getting lost into a world with fantastic and unique imagination. The book is over 600 pages, yet is a page turner as my senses are awakened by each sentence. I’m reminded of the feeling of reading “Akata Witch” by Nnedi Okorafor, one of my favorite book series.

"Book On It"

“Where is your bookmark?”

My bookmark is in the novel, “The Almond” by Nedjma. Badra leaves an arranged marriage that has depleted her soul. She flees her place of birth to her Aunt Selma’s home to finally speak on her sexual experiences. As a Muslim woman, Badra also rediscovers her being and desire. Each page widened my eyes. This is going to be a read!

Update: After having finished this novel, there are scenes of rape towards the end of the book.

"Book On It"

“Where is your bookmark?!”

My bookmark is in the novel, “The Way I Die” by Derek Haas. This book is the last (at least for now) of “The Silver Bear Series.” I’ve devoured the series for the past four months. Columbus, the main character, has become an intriguing and desolate character. These books are the first time I’ve witnessed action lift from the page. I also added a few places to my literary passport.

I’m glad to have read the books before the film adaptations arrive.

"Book On It"

“Where is your bookmark?”

My bookmark is in the novel, “Fade Into You” by Nikki Darling. I heard Darling on the “Call Your Girlfriend” podcast. I loved her energy and writing process. The book is a wonder. The main character’s first name has not even been mentioned in the pages so far. I am on page 40. As a narrator, she keeps me on my toes. Is she talking to me? Am I going to be let more into the world the characters inhabit? I am a fly on the wall where smoke from their joint flows against.

The pages are full of vivid action with stunning rebellion. I am reading this book on the bus, having to pay close attention to not miss my stop.